Tidbits of Recovery – #8


Let’s take a look at some of the detrimental effects of fear to the physical body.

Because fear gets hormones careening through your body, these hormones present on a regular or frequent basis, can cause destructive effect. Adrenaline causes the heart to pound harder and faster, making the pulse race and the lung’s respirations increase in frequency in an attempt to increase oxygen supply so you can fight or run. On a steady basis, not in exercise mode, this acceleration of pulse rate is detrimental to your heart. The heart is expending far more effort than is necessary.

There is a difference between your heart pounding faster than normal because you are on a treadmill in a gymnasium and your heart pounding faster due to stress. Treadmill walking or running does not ask for cortisol, the harsh hormone, but fear does.

According to Elizabeth Scott, M.S., a stress management expert:

Higher and more prolonged levels of cortisol in the bloodstream (like those associated with chronic stress) have been shown to have negative effects, such as:

– Impaired cognitive performance
– Suppressed thyroid function
– Blood sugar imbalances such as hyperglycemia
– Decreased bone density
– Decrease in muscle tissue
– Higher blood pressure
– Lowered immunity and inflammatory responses in the body, slowed wound healing, and other health consequences

Increased abdominal fat, which is associated with a greater amount of health problems than fat deposited in other areas of the body. Some of the health problems associated with increased stomach fat are heart attacks, strokes, the development of metabolic syndrome, higher levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and lower levels of good cholesterol (HDL), which can lead to other health problems!

Take a look at the things in your life that cause you stress, and think/pray about what you can do to remove them from your experience.